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Wills
A will is a legal document that gives your instructions for distributing your assets after you die.  You can select and Executor to manage the distribution of your assets, pay your debts and handle other duties.  A will is not very expensive, generally, and without a will your property may be required to go through a lengthy process called probate in which the court oversees the distribution of assets.

Living Trusts
A living trust, also known as a revocable living trust is a legal relationship in which a trustee is named to hold and manage property for the benefit of another individual, called a beneficiary. The creator of the trust , know as the settlor or trustor, may act as the trustee until he or she dies, at which time a names successor trustee takes over the management duties associated with the trust. A trust is able to hold real and personal property assets, generally designed to benefit the trustor during their lifetime and then pass on to the named beneficiaries upon death. A trust is more complex and expensive than a will. But after death, assets placed in a trust do not have to go through a probate processing.

Which Document is Best?
A living trust and a will both provide means for a person to make decisions as to who shall receive their assets following their death.  A trust has more flexibility and some advantages that a will does not provide, however, a trust is more expensive to create.

The cost of probate, in time and money, may make the creation of a trust much more cost effective. However not everyone benefits from the creation of a trust.  If your estate is simple and you have taken steps to title assets in a manner that can avoid probate, such as joint tenancy or POD, then a will may be your best option.  Before making that decision you should consult an attorney or financial planner, or both.

Bankruptcy

Bankruptcy in the United States is a matter placed under Federal jurisdiction by the United States Constitution (in Article 1, Section 8, Clause 4), which allows Congress to enact "uniform laws on the subject of bankruptcies throughout the United States." The Congress has enacted statute law governing bankruptcy, primarily in the form of the Bankruptcy Code, located at Title 11 of the United States Code.

Estate Planning

A Will is a legal document that gives instructions for distributing your assests after you die.  With a will you can selct an executor to manage the distribution of your assets, pay your debts and handle other duties. A living trust, also known as a revocable living trust is a legal relationship in which a trustee is named to hold and manage property for the benefit of another individual, called a beneficiary.